Thought on Atheism

From my experience, it is fascinating to me how anti-Christians–such as some hard-core atheists–can nearly always find a way to be dissatisfied and complain  with something that God has done:  for example, anti-Christians complain that Jesus came to Earth at a time when He could not be video-recorded or photographed or interviewed by fifteen different news agencies; and yet, if Jesus had come at a time when these things could happen, anti-Christians would complain about how late Jesus came into the world and that He should not have waited so long before showing Himself to us; and if Jesus came to Earth all the time, anti-Christians would complain about Jesus acting like an oppressive North Korean dictator who forces Himself upon His creatures, just like Christopher Hitchens used to call God; and if Jesus came to Earth just a few times, anti-Christians would complain that He did not come often enough to prove that He was Jesus, for maybe He was just an alien, etc.; in essence, it is amazing how the anti-Christian truly can always find something to complain about concerning the Christian faith, which thereby serves as a clue that perhaps the problem is with the complainer himself, not with the faith.

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10 thoughts on “Thought on Atheism

    • KIA,

      There is a difference between complaining and pointing out a fact. Anti-Christians can be understood as complaining because they are never satisfied, no matter the outcome or event, whereas I am not complaining about them, but am simply pointing out this fact. It would be good for you to appreciate the difference and learn it.

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      • I guess you could say one persons asking for evidence and presenting opposing facts is another person’s complaining. It’s all in your POV.

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      • No KIA, it is not your POV. The point is that no matter what answer the Christian provides, the anti-Christian fits some ad hoc and pathetic reason to reject the answer. And he does this every time. That is not a demand for evidence, it is actually a way to deny whatever evidence is provided. It is the opposite of asking for evidence, for whatever evidence is presented, so excuse will be made to exclude it.

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      • Or he could be showing you that your evidence isn’t what you think it is. POV my friend. Can’t always assume your right and the other person is wrong. No one learns anything or grows that way

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      • Let’s try another way. Rather than generalities, can you think of a specific topic or escuse or fact that they argue? Maybe I can understand your frustration better if something specific can be identified.

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    • It is perhaps the case that certain Christians are too easily satisfied, but that claim is completely separate from the fact that ‘anti-Christians’ are never satisfied with answered that are provided. Furthermore, certain ‘anti-Christians’ such as atheistic-naturalists, are much more easily satisfied than Christians are. For example, the evidence for abiogenesis…nearly zero, and yet atheistic-naturalists are still satisfied that it happened somehow. The evidence for consciousness from unconscious matter…zero, and yet atheistic-naturalists are still satisfied that it happened somehow. Indeed, all to often, it is the anti-Christian who is way too easily satisfied.

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  1. Jesus could have emerged in China, where reading and writing was a lot more common and the population was generally literate. Instead, he arrived within a few kilometers of literally everything else in the Bible.
    Jesus could have replaced Cain or Abel, meaning there weren’t between 6 and 100 thousand years of lost human souls.
    Jesus, generally, said good things, according to what is written about him. But he said to illiterate sheep-herders who couldn’t write anything down so all his messages were only hearsay for 2 or 3 generations.
    This is fine, if it’s a random emergence of another culture and myth; it makes perfect sense under those circumstances. But, as are as infallible plans so, not so much…

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